About "Amhrán Duit"

hello

When i read these words "Amhrán Duit", i immediately thought they were irish.
I know the irish words "Dia Duit" that are used to say "hello" and means something like "god bless you".
But i wouldn't try to pronounce these words, irish written and irish spoken are very different. if i remember, "dia duit " is pronounced something like "deer-rheet". only one irish-speaking can tell us that

Regards

Izarriel
All the Celtic languages are so nice. i love Irish, Welsh and Scottich Gaelic. They are all somewhat similiar, but different int heir own ways. I am really glad to see that there has been a resurgance in recent years. I was in Wales a few years agoa nd everywhere the laguage is used alongside English.

Luc Da
Mike
The Old Irish amra was a lament or memorial poem/song; in Modern Irish, an amhrán is a poem based in assonance rather than in a syllabic meter (such a syllabic poem is called a dán). So, my guess is that "Amhrán Duit" might be referring to both meanings--the older as well as the newer, and would thus be a "lament for you" (duit is a conjugated preposition, do meaning "to/for" with a second person singular suffix), with the "you" possibly being Ronald Rees...as this is Loreena's first studio album since the tragedy of his death, I thought it might be likely to have some sort of recognition for Ronald and Richard Rees and Gregory Cook. Though, it could just be "a song for you," for anyone...who knows? Only the liner notes will be able to say for sure, and we have to wait ten more days for those!

[The usual translation of Dia duit is "God be with you," incidentally.]

The Old Irish pronunciation of amra is "OV-ra," and I believe the Modern Irish is similar, so therefore "OV-ron" in this case; in some dialects, it might be "OW-ron" instead.
Amrhán Duit is Irish (a Gaelic language, but "Gaelic" by itself usually refers to Scottish Gaelic)--the Gaelic version might be similar, but at the very least Scottish Gaelic uses accents facing the other direction. As someone said above, it means roughly "A Song to/for You."
Pronunciation varies a lot with the various dialects, and I've heard at least five or six different ways to say "Dia duit," but one I've seen a lot is "ditch," which I believe is the Ulster pronunciation. I'd hazard this as something like "ow-rawn ditch."
I'm only a beginner in Irish, though, and I'm learning from books and tapes instead of a native speaker, so that's a shaky guess.
I hear that Irish Gaelic is a tricky language to learn, as well, because of it's late introduction to a written form. I love the language, and hope to learn it some day during my music pursuits.

Good luck with your learning! I've been studying Japanese, and I find there's a strange magic to speaking a foreign language.
Amhrán duit means 'lament'. Most combinations like this (song with/for you) cannot be taken literally as they often do not make sense. As a native gaeilge speaker the pronunciation does differ but not considerably from province to province and the more usual way of say pronouncing this is owRAWN ditch. 'J' is not used as somebody stated to pronounce 'd', possible confusing it with the 'ghui' sound of 'dh'.
Hi there,

I read this post and simply HAD to mention it - jsuty wait til you hear Manx Gaelic (Gaelic from the Isle of Man)...for an example search for the song "Lhiannan Shee" by the Mediaeval Babes, they used the language in that song.
Also there's Cornish, which is some form of language which resembles Welsh...again, try the Mediaeval Baebes song "Temptasyon" ...Although the Baebes themselves are not Gaelic-speakers, they have used both languages Wink

Love,
Phantas

quote:
Originally posted by hotguymike:
All the Celtic languages are so nice. i love Irish, Welsh and Scottich Gaelic. They are all somewhat similiar, but different int heir own ways. I am really glad to see that there has been a resurgance in recent years. I was in Wales a few years agoa nd everywhere the laguage is used alongside English.

Luc Da
Mike
quote:
Originally posted by Phantas:
Hi there,

I read this post and simply HAD to mention it - jsuty wait til you hear Manx Gaelic (Gaelic from the Isle of Man)...for an example search for the song "Lhiannan Shee" by the Mediaeval Babes, they used the language in that song.
Also there's Cornish, which is some form of language which resembles Welsh...again, try the Mediaeval Baebes song "Temptasyon" ...Although the Baebes themselves are not Gaelic-speakers, they have used both languages Wink

Love,
Phantas

Here is another fine example of Manx Gaelic from another great Celtic voice: Emma Christian sings Ushag Veg Ruy (Little Red Bird); Oikan ayns Bethlehem (Birth In Bethlehem);O Kirree T'ou Goll Dy Faagail Mee (O Kirree, Thou Wilt Leave Me); and Arrane Oie Vie (The Goodnight Song), all on the album Celtic Voices: Women of Song(Narada Media, 1995). Unfortunately, the album does not come with translations.

--Artúr

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